Monday, May 7, 2012

300 economists agree, marijuana legalization could save U.S. billions

 More then 300 economists signed a petition declaring the legalization of marijuana could save the government over $13 billion a year, and that's just the start.

The current state of the economy has put millions out of work, and has led to close evaluation of government spending. The the federal deficit is over $1.5 trillion and our country is practically owned by China, Japan, UK and religion. Now the people are speaking up about "common sense" governing, better spending and ridding Washington of corrupt money hording career politicians. Now economists believe they've found a way to make a large step towards repairing our country.

Over 300 economists, including well known experienced forecasters and nobel laureates, have signed a petition siting the findings by Harvard economist Jeffrey Miron. Miron reports that if the government legalized marijuana to be regulated like alcohol and tobacco, the U.S. can save over $7.7 billion a year from not having to enforce prohibition.

Miron as noted that the federal government would save and additional $6 billion a year for taxing marijuana like alcohol and tobacco. The group wants it to be understood that they are not calling for the legalization of marijuana, they are only reporting and backing the facts.

Saving over $13 billion a year would be the first stepping stone of saving the country hundreds of billions, we could start farming hemp again. Hemp is cheap, easy to grow, and very durable. The U.S could make rope for the military, clothe all military, police and blue collar employees, save money in government assisted health care and much, much more for simply legalizing hemp and marijuana.

$13 billion may not be that much considering the $1.5 trillion we owe, but it opens up the possibility off looking for solutions outside of the box, while creating a more free and logical world.

300 economists agree, marijuana legalization could save U.S. billions - Phoenix Cannabis Culture | Examiner.com