Monday, September 1, 2014

Weed Humor







Sunday, August 31, 2014

U.S. government to grow 30 times more marijuana this year

By Lauren Raab

The U.S. government has upped the quantity of marijuana it’s growing this year, to more than 1,400 pounds from the originally planned 46.

The federal government classifies marijuana as a substance that has no medical use and is more dangerous than cocaine. But it’s willing to let researchers have access — under a few conditions.

One condition is that each project needs approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration. Another is that researchers get the substance from a particular source: the federal government.
How much marijuana does the government grow?

The marijuana is grown at the University of Mississippi, which has the federal contract to do so for research purposes, DEA spokesman Rusty Payne said, and the quotas exist “so we don’t have too much of something that could get diverted” to non-sanctioned purposes. Continue Reading...

Friday, August 29, 2014

Marijuana takes center stage at Emmys

2014 Emmys: Marijuana takes center stage 


By Hollie McKay
Published August 26, 2014
FoxNews.com

LOS ANGELES –  The 66th Annual Primetime Emmys might have lacked in laughs, but it still managed to hit plenty of “high” notes.

Monday night’s telecast was peppered in jabs and jokes centered on pot – which is legal for medical purposes in the state of California – and perhaps signifies how vast the movement is gaining acceptance across the country.

“Cable is looking at Netflix the way Justin Bieber looks at One Direction, through a cloud of marijuana smoke,” host Seth Meyers said in his opening monologue, mocking the pop prince’s various alleged encounters with marijuana-centric controversies.

Haley Delany later praiseD her “Louie” TV father Louis C.K in a pre-taped video for educating her on “how to properly hold a joint,” while Jimmy Kimmel took aim at actor Matthew McConaughey for selling his television “for a conch shell full of weed.” Amy Poehler took the marijuana antics one step further by declaring that McConaughey and his “True Detective” co-star Woody Harrelson are “menu items at most marijuana dispensaries.”

Singer Adam Levine also gave us a small fist pump in support of the legalization of marijuana in the United States. But it was Sarah Silverman’s weed-promoting antics throughout the evening that garnered the most attention.

“This is my pot, my liquid pot,” she enthused on the red carpet, pulling out her vaporizer pen and later insisting that her purse must-haves are a “phone and pot… and gum.”

The comedienne went on to win the award for Outstanding Writing in a Variety Special for her HBO Comedy Special “Sarah Silverman: We Are Miracles,” kicking off her shoes and running fiercely to the stage where she declared that “we’re all just made of molecules and we’re all hurling through space right now.”

But the oddities didn’t end there. A distracted Silverman attributed her questionable actions to “feeling weird” having just watched the Robin Williams tribute, and insisted that she wasn’t stoned.

“I don’t drink. I like to have a puff as a treat at appropriate times,” she continued, also noting that she brought some pot-based goods for later in the evening. Continue Reading...

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Marijuana Tea & CannApple Upside Down Cake


 
Marijuana Tea / Weed Tea

Ingredients
1 Tea Cup
1 Tea bag
1 Teaspoon of bud butter / cannabutter

Scale ingredients by 1 for each person


Directions

    Add  the 1 tsp. of bud butter / cannabutter and tea bag to the cup.
    Boil the water and pour it in
    Let the bud butter / cannabutter fully dissovle.
    Remove the tea bag, add milk (optional), and consume


Tip: You can add mint or any other herbal tea flavors to enhance the taste.






CannApple Upside Down Cake


Ingredients
Cana-Mel & Apples

    3/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
    1/4 cup unsalted CannaButter, softened
    2 tablespoons honey
    2-3 apples, Braeburn or Fuji, peeled and sliced to 1/4 inch

Cake

    2 cups all-purpose flour
    1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cup unsalted CannaButter, softened
    3/4 cup sugar
    3 eggs
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/4 cup whole milk



Directions

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9 x 2-inch round baking pan with cooking spray. Line bottom with parchment paper.
    Heat brown sugar, 1/4 cup CannaButter and honey in medium saucepan over medium heat until sugar dissolves, stirring frequently. Increase heat to medium-high, bring to a boil. Boil for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Pour into pan.
    Arrange apple slices over caramel mixture in 2 overlapping concentric circles to cover bottom of pan, starting on outside edge.
    Whisk flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt in medium bowl. Beat 3/4 cup CannaButter and sugar in large bowl at medium spread for 2 minutes, until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla.
    At low speed, beat in flour mixture alternately with milk just until incorporated and smooth, beginning and ending with flour mixture. Carefully spread batter over apple slices.
    Bake 45-50 minutes or until cake is golden brown and pulls slightly away from sides and toothpick inserted in center comes out with a few moist crumbs attached.
    Cool in pan on wire rack for 5 minutes. Invert onto wire rack, remove parchment. Serve warm.


http://www.thestonerscookbook.com

Medical marijuana could reduce painkiller abuse



Could medical marijuana be an antidote for the nation's scourge of fatal overdoses caused by prescription pain medication? A new study suggests the answer is yes, and it's set off a flurry of medical debate over the risks and benefits of making cannabis more widely available to patients.

The new research, published Monday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, finds that deaths associated with the use of opiate drugs fell in 13 states after they legalized medical marijuana. Compared to states with no formal access to marijuana, those that allowed certain patients legal access to cannabis saw a steady drop in opiate-related overdoses that reached 33%, on average, six years after the states' medical marijuana laws took effect.

"The striking implication is that medical marijuana laws, when implemented, may represent a promising approach for stemming runaway rates of nonintentional opioid-analgesic-related deaths," wrote opiate abuse researchers Dr. Mark S. Brown and Marie J. Hayes in a commentary published alongside the study. "If true, this finding upsets the apple cart of conventional wisdom regarding the public health implications of marijuana legalizations and medicinal usefulness."

That apple cart has already been shaken by a growing body of research that suggests marijuana's psychoactive ingredients may enhance the pain-killing effects of opiate drugs, allowing patients using marijuana for pain to take lower — and less dangerous — doses of opiate medications.

"It's so apparent that our patients can decrease, diminish or wean themselves completely off of opiates, and that it improves their quality of life," said Dr. Donald Abrams, a UC San Francisco oncologist who was not involved with the study.

In a small study published in 2011, Abrams found that cancer patients taking morphine and oxycodone experienced greater pain relief at lower opiate blood concentrations when a vaporized form of marijuana was added to their drug regimen. He has just begun recruiting for a study that will explore whether the same formulation can reduce pain, inflammation and opiate doses in patients with sickle-cell disease.

But those who have opposed expanding access to medical marijuana said they were not persuaded that cannabis — a plant designated by the Drug Enforcement Agency as having "no recognized medicinal use" — is a safer alternative to opioids.

"Clearly the study raised an intriguing hypothesis, but many questions still need to be answered," the National Institute on Drug Abuse said in a statement released Monday. The analysis "should not be oversimplified," the statement warned. Continue Reading...